Mi Amor, Boca Juniors

Remembering The Words For Love

While working on my newest story, I found myself having issues putting into words my love for the most beautiful sport in the world: el fútbol. I was mostly having issues expressing what football means to me—the feeling of being on the pitch, of having the ball at my feet, or of cheering on the greatest team in the world. As Boca Juniors’ anniversary approached, the words for love started to reappear, and I found accurate ways to describe how much the azul y oro truly means to me, and I remembered the faithful ways to convey to the world what this sport means, how it makes my heart pump.

When I found myself struggling to come up with the words for love—for this team, and for this sport (I blame it on the Primera Division’s Summer break)—it took the celebration, the birthday, to revive the sensation. My short story is currently in the works and coming soon. It has been shaped into a creative non-fiction piece, which analyzes the event when a friend asked a group of writers what is the saddest story they could come up with on the spot. Of course, my story tells of obstacles that keep one from playing football, while the others jokingly tell cliché stories about loss and plain misfortune. But thanks to this week’s birthday celebration, I am back on track finding the right words for love.

El mejor del mundo @BocaJrsOficial
[feliz cumpleaños – Abril 3, 1905] 📷 – FujiFilm X100T

As is my newest short story, Boca Juniors is a story of love, a story of generations. This is a story of a birth of a team, one that changed the hearts of millions, that changed the attitude of the poor and desolate, the destitute. A team that from the start has helped find a spark of life in many, helped the lonely find reason, showed them why.

The heart beats with quickness when Boca Juniors takes the field. The sweat pours when the minutes count down—not because the game might be in jeopardy, but because the game is unfortunately coming to a close, and it won’t be days until we see them play again. There is a saying among my people “un domingo sin Boca, no es domingo,” which translates to, “a Sunday without Boca, is not a Sunday.” When Boca strings passes together, creates art on the pitch, puts one in the back of the net, it creates a moment of pure joy that is truly indescribable. These are moments of pure bliss and uncontrollable joy.

This team reminds me of why I love the sport.

“Boca es el sentimiento más cercano al que uno tiene por su madre.” – Maradona
[feliz cumpleaños – Abril 3, 1905]
 📷 – FujiFilm X100T


The photos in this post were taken at the Boca Juniors Restaurant in Queens, NY, on Sunday, December 4, 2016. Boca Juniors was down 2-1 at half against bitter rivals River Plate (history of this rivalry is one of epic legends). On the back of a true hero—one of few players who taught me what loving this team really means—the game was turned. Carlitos Tevez scored twice in the second half (61, 81) and so began the party in the restaurant.

El que no salta se fue a la B!
[feliz cumpleaños – Abril 3, 1905] 📷 – FujiFilm X100T


Shoutout to Netflix: They recently included Boca Juniors 3D: The Movie. If you want to further educate yourself on this great team, watch this sports documentary, indulge in this love. Within the first few minutes you will be overwhelmed with emotion, even if it is the first time you’ve seen La Bombonera, the Boca Juniors stadium, or La Boca, Buenos Aires, which houses the stadium. The moment the camera guides you up the infamous stairwell, leading you onto the pitch, you will be hooked. The love will pour.

— Nahuel F.A.

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